Wednesday Evening Open House for Individuals or Group Studio Visits


COAST TO COAST CAMBRIDGE TOUR
FALL 1999


Art work from "Reaching Out Child Abuse Monument"
tours twelve Canadian Cities hosted by Cambridge Malls.

Cross Canada Tour Sponsored By Cambridge Shopping Centres
The Situation
Introduction
An Offer of Support
Tour and Campaign Objectives
Plan and Implementation
Results
Media Response to the "Reaching Out" Tour
 

Cross Canada Tour Sponsored By (Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited) and The Millennium Bureau of Canada

Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited had the courage and leadership vision to bring "Reaching Out" to Canadian communities. An award-winning National 13 city, Coast to Coast tour in the fall of 1999 provided on-site information, displays and education, and a media reach of more than 20 million.

We wish to greatly thank all the Cambridge staff from across Canada who made extraordinary contributions to the quality and effectiveness.

Shirley Mesbur
Director, National Marketing
Asset Management Group
Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited

and

Lorne Braithewaite
President,
Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited


Lorne Braithewaite had the
leadership courage and vision
to sponsor the first national
tour of the Child Abuse
Survivor Monument Project
art and educational exhibitions.

 

In Atlanta at the ICSC 2000 Fall Convention, Cambridge won a Maxi Merit Award for the "Give Us A Hand Tour" in Community Service, in the Company or joint Centre category. In early October, again in the same category, Cambridge won a coveted Maple Leaf Award in the Canadian competition.

 


Dr. Irving presents Lorne Braithwaite with a gift from Ken Dryden of a collector's photos from the last calendar at Maple Leaf Gardens.

 

 


Devonshire Mall, Ontario

The Situation
Child abuse and shopping centres; it's hard to imagine them in the same breath. Shopping centres are today's town squares. Child abuse, one of society's darkest secrets, is a deeply disturbing reality of our time. It is not always recognized by the public or in the media and given the magnitude of the problem, it receives surprisingly little exposure.

The numbers are staggering. In 1997, Statistics Canada reported that 62% of the sexual assaults - 19,000 were on children under 18 years of age; two thirds were under 12. In 1995, the Gallup Organization stated that more than 90% of child abuse cases are unreported, and that number still stands five years later. Happily, there are steps being taken to move the issue into the public arena and assist the survivors of child abuse.

At the time of the Cambridge Tour the Monument Project was reviewing several sites in downtown for the "Reaching Out" Monument.

By 1998, the project was
still largely unknown to
members of the general public.

Displays included panels with
art, poetry, inspirational
messages, information on child
abuse and the Project's sponsors.


In shopping centres across
Canada the display art work
and poetry provided a natural
means to talk about "such a
sensitive topic".


Speaking out against the silence at South Centre Mall, Calgary, Alberta

Many people found the exhibits
to be an opportunity for quite
reflection.

Normalizing an issue that is
stigmatized in our society --
Southcentre logo on a
handprint message:
"Love conquers all!
Don't be afraid to tell
someone about your
experience." Joanie


Opening the door for
interaction, education and
help -- A handprint message:
"It is not an easy thing to live.
Lets work together to stop
ABUSE! Kimberley

Over 3,200 handprints were collected at the 12 exhibits.

View Samples of HandPrints
from Southcentre Mall


Hockey legend Lanny McDonald contributes a HandPrint to change the face of child abuse in Canada at South Centre Mall in Calgary, Alberta

 

Each centre's internal communication was unique, with art for our sample Press Kit used to customize merchant communications, signage and door stickers.


At Cambridge Mall child abuse art display in Windsor, Ontario Fred Beven informs that 90 percent of abuse is not reported to a Children's Aid Society.


Canadian Red Cross and Burlington, Ontario are part of Cambridge Tour

 

 

Introduction
Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited, was introduced to the issue through The Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project and psychotherapist and sculptor Dr. Michael Irving. Ken and Linda Dryden arranged for their friend, Lorne Braithwaite, President of Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited, to visit the Monument studio.

On a follow up visit to Michael Irving's studio, Cambridge executives and management learned about his work and the unique challenges his organization faces. Their vision was to build a gigantic bronze sculpture dedicated to survivors of child abuse. Located on a site in Toronto, Ontario, "Reaching Out" would consist of 276 bronze sculptured squares, created in therapy sessions with survivors of child abuse from across Canada, on two large bronze figures. Inside the hollow Monument figures would be space for public participation through handprints and messages of hope. Since 1996 the "Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project" had worked to establish credibility for its mission and the sculpture. Various levels of government, a few politicians and of course, social action and survivor support groups had taken notice. However, by 1998, the project was still largely unknown to members of the general public.

 

 

An Offer of Support
lt was important present the issue and exhibit in a positive way. Like many public venues, Cambridge Shopping Centres strive to make their centres pleasant, happy places to visit and clearly, this topic was neither. Though Dr. Irving's sculpture is an uplifting and joyous salute to survivors of child abuse, Cambridge executives wondered if it was suitable for a shopping centre environment. Would their Centre Management share the "vision" and buy-in to this opportunity to make a positive contribution? How would their retailers respond? Would their shoppers, with their diverse demographic, psychographic and ethnic groups, welcome or shun a mall display dedicated to such a sensitive topic? If they were to communicate to the public at large, they would have to involve the media. How would the media respond to a very public presentation on child abuse in a shopping centre?

As well, Cambridge's experience in mounting travelling exhibits showed that they were extremely costly to execute and very time-consuming to co-ordinate. Cambridge had no available staff to supervise and execute the detailed logistics. They knew that their centres, with shrinking Marketing budgets, would not be able to fund such an ambitious national tour.

Given the topic, all aspects of the presentation had to be very well done and very professional. Otherwise, it had the potential to turn into a public relations nightmare. But Cambridge executives believed that their company could make an important and groundbreaking contribution, if their Centres could rise to these challenges.

 

 

Tour and Campaign Objectives

1. Normalize an issue that is stigmatized in our society by bringing Child Abuse and its survivors to the attention of large numbers of people.

2. Work with the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project to plan and design a mall display suitable for exhibition in all Cambridge Shopping Centres.

3. Create awareness about the "Reaching Out" sculpture and The Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project by coordinating a national tour of 13 Cambridge Shopping Centres.

4. Obtain sponsorship, partners and in-kind donations to defray expenses relating to the tour.

5. Generate $5,000 in donations for the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project itself.

6. Gather 2,000 personal handprints and messages of hope to eventually be sealed inside the Monument.

7. Heighten the profiles of the Centres on the tour by gaining positive media exposure for the event, and for the Project.

8. Communicate with actual survivors of child abuse and open the door for interaction, education and help.

 

 

Plan and Implementation
Courageously and with vision Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited decided to coordinate a tour of their Centres and held a series of meetings with Dr. Irving and his team in the Winter and Spring of 1999 to establish the tour's mission, content, design criteria and logistics. October 1999, Child Abuse Awareness month was the target for the tour. Because of the sensitive nature of the topic, Cambridge approached their centres to ask for participation; 13 centres located from Newfoundland to British Columbia voluntarily agreed to join in. We named the tour "Give Us a Hand", to draw attention to the survivors' handprints that formed the framework for the Monument itself.

We knew that the display must be of a high quality, so cost was an issue. The Millennium Bureau of Canada, a government body designed to give federal funding for worthy projects to mark the millennium year, agreed to fund 2 exhibits. Cambridge requested 3 displays to allow a minimum of 4 days per centre plus travel time. The designers of the exhibits, "The Portables", donated the third display. Cambridge worked with Dr. Irving to ensure that each display was identical, upbeat and colourful, secure, flexible and easily transportable. Cambridge agreed to coordinate and pay for the shipping across Canada and they knew air shipping would be needed, so the displays and crates had to be light. Each display would include: bronze handprint squares and poetry from the Monument; a space for the public to draw handprints to be included inside the completed Monument; a secure place for donations; racks for literature; art pieces and merchandise for sale, featuring the memorable "logo" of the Monument itself; and abundant signage. The displays included a shipping and assembly manual and specific floor plans, since each Centre would need a complete "package".

 

 




Survivor Monument staff, Cambridge staff and volunteers and staff from the Red Cross Abuse Prevention services work as a team customize the exhibit and activities to the unique characteristics of each community and Cambridge Shopping Centre.

 

Because the public would expect credible assistance when they saw the topic, the exhibits would need to be appropriately staffed.

The Red Cross Abuse Prevention Services agreed to partner on the tour, providing staff for the 13 centres for all hours each Centre was open. They agreed to hold training sessions for the volunteer staff and have their own professionals available as well.

To supervise the mall displays, Dr. Irving along with his wife Cheryl, Cheryl Irving's family, Al, Gord, and Bill Clint and Jake Goertzen for Winnipeg agreed to travel with the 3 exhibits. Al Clint, Cheryl's father, got all of their travel, hotels and meals donated for the tour.

Cambridge designed a very specific travel schedule that included both truck and air transport and worked with a national firm, SwiftSure, that delivered the 3 exhibits to locations across the country on time on a very tight schedule.


Al Clint, a retired senior, was a sensitive listener at "Reaching Out" Exhibits across Ontario.
BAYSHORE MALL OTTAWA
 

Child Abuse Monument Display at Bayshore
Shopping Centre in Ottawa, Ontario tells
victims they should never be ashamed.
 


The children from school in the Ottawa area lined up on three levels of the Cambridge Mall and buried Dr. Irving under a mountain of handprint messages.

 

 

Cambridge offered each mall the flexibility to coordinate a "unique" event. All produced their own merchant communication and signage but with limited budgets, Cambridge viewed that that PR would be the most effective way to reach mass audiences.

Centres received a media kit that the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project had prepared and they could customize it in their own way. The Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project had professional PSA's for radio and TV produced and donated for Centres to use.

To create a media event for the exhibit openings, some Centres had local schools attend and do handprints for inclusion in the Monument; others had guests speak on the Project and child abuse, like hockey great Ken Dryden or they invited local mayors, politicians, VIPs or media personalities to speak.

For each mall display, the public was invited to review the contents of each panel, and discuss the issue. Everyone was invited to make handprints. Merchandise with the Project logo was sold for fundraising and while donations were not actively sought, they were accepted.

Information was disseminated and literature was available from the National Clearing House on Family Violence, the Red Cross Abuse Prevention Services, the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project and interested agencies in the region of each Exhibit.


All centres coordinated unique
PR campaigns using the sample
Press Kit prepared for guidelines.
Many used Cambridge labels,
stationery, art, rendering
and handprint sheets.


Winnipeg artist and guitarist Jake
Goertzen wrote a song dedicated to
the tour and survivors of child abuse;
he sang it at Kiladonan Place.

 

 


Moira McGrath, Marketing Director for Bayshore Shopping Centre
presenting their donation.

RESULTS

1. Normalize an issue that is stigmatized in our society by bringing Child Abuse and its survivors to the attention of large numbers of people. The first major showing of a display honouring survivors of child abuse was presented to mass audiences in the common areas of Cambridge Shopping Centres. Tour supervisors stated that every day, there were many comments from the public, addressing the fact that they "never expected to see something on this topic in a shopping centre!" Overwhelmingly, comments were favourable, supportive and complimentary; and many stated that they felt the centre and the Cambridge organization showed great "courage" in presenting the display.

2. Cambridge worked with the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project to plan and design a mall display suitable for exhibition in all Cambridge Shopping Centres. The 3 mall displays were designed specifically for this tour. They were unique and lightweight and the shipping containers became a framework for the actual display units themselves. They were identical, upbeat and colourful, encouraged open discussion and interaction and received compliments from the public.

3. Created awareness about the " Reaching Out" sculpture and the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project by coordinating a national tour of 13 Cambridge Shopping Centres. From Newfoundland to British Columbia, the "Give Us A Hand" tour was featured in 13 of these Centres; according to mall electronic traffic counters, mall traffic for the 4 day 13 centre presentations reached a total of 913,050 people.

4. Obtained sponsorship, partners and in-kind donations to defray expenses relating to the tour. The Millennium Bureau of Canada, The Red Cross Abuse Prevention Services, the CCAA, the builders of the display and many other organizations and companies contributed to the tour. In all, we obtained over $106,000 in sponsorships, partners' contributions, and in-kind donations. 4 times greater than Cambridge's actual costs.

5. Generated $5,000 in funds for the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project itself. The public response was moving; many people asked to contribute, even though money was not actively solicited. A total of $5,796 was collected for the Monument Project. The Project also made money from T-shirts, hats and vests which they sold to raise additional revenue for their cause. Cambridge assisted the Project in this aspect of the fundraising and $4,840 worth of their merchandise was sold at the displays. In total the tour raised over $10,600 through sales and donations.

6. Gathered 2,000 personal handprints and messages of hope to eventually be sealed inside the Monument. People of all ages drew their hands, including some important celebrities and politicians. Ralph Klein, Premier of Alberta and The Honorable Herb Gray, Deputy Prime Minister of Canada drew hands, as did hockey great Ken Dryden. In all, 3,259 handprints with messages of hope were given to Dr. Irving for inclusion in the monument exceeding our initial objective by 63%.

7. Heightened the profiles of the Centres on the tour by gaining positive media exposure for the event, and for the Project. Publicity coverage was significant; the Centres received over 17.05 hours of radio and TV airtime, reaching in excess of 48.7 million people and 10,182 lines+6.5 pages of print, reaching 2.5 million readers.

8. Communicated with actual survivors of child abuse and opened the doors for interaction, education and help. Best of all, at every mall, people responded; they learned about this dark topic and actual survivors came forward to talk about their abuse, many for the first time. Coordinators reported that at each mall many people came up and thanked the Centre Management for having the courage to feature the display. At one Centre, one child came forward, reported abuse and the case was passed through The Red Cross Abuse Prevention Services on to the Children's Aid Society.


Many handprints were
multicoloured or drawn with
global images in the recognition
by child that this child abuse is
a concern that crosses cultures
and geographic boundaries.



The opportunity to listen to the
thoughtfulness and passion of
children was a pleasure.



Handprints were displayed and
their fascinating and important
messages were read by many.


South Centre Mall in Calgary raises awarness on Child Abuse



Children were proud and
excited that their art work
and messages would be a part
of a permanent Monument.



Carolynn Bennett, MP, along
with many other politicians
and community leaders across
Canada used the Cambridge
Shopping Centre venues for
addressing the public on the
importance of responding to
the concerns of child abuse.



Many stated that they felt the
centre and the Cambridge
organization showed great
"courage" in presenting the display.

 

 

Media Response to the "Reaching Out" Tour

LENDING A HAND FOR A WORTHY CAUSE!

Ken Dryden, president of the Toronto Maple Leafs, lent a hand to a very worthy cause - the official launch of the "Give Us A Hand" tour at Upper Canada Mall, Newmarket Ont. on Sept. 29/99. Dryden was joined in the campaign, which honoured the survivors of child abuse, by then Newmarket Regional Councilor Diane Humeniuk, Aurora Mayor Tim Jones and Dr. Michael Irving. The display was part of the first national tour of art from the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project and was funded, in part, by the Millennium Bureau of Canada. Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited, Upper Canada Mall's parent company, sponsored the initial Canadian tour that visited 13 centres from coast to coast. The tour gave the public an opportunity to see that child abuse can and should be discussed in an open and healthy manner.

For a small donation, people traced their handprint and wrote an inspirational message on 8'x11" sheets of paper that will be included inside the actual sculpture when it is permanently positioned at the Air Canada Centre. Donations and proceeds from the shows were sent via the Canadian Centre for Abuse Awareness to further the objectives of the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project.

 


Hockey Great Ken Dryden contributes HandPrint to "Reaching Out Child Abuse Monument"


Ken Dryden and Dr. Irving inform
on the tragedy of childabuse.


The Review, Richmond, B.C., October 6, 1999
Touring Art Exhibit Tackles Child Abuse

An interactive art display that hopes to bring child abuse out of the shadows of shame and cast a light on the subject for public discussion is coming to Lansdowne Park shopping centre for four days starting on Wednesday, Oct. 6.

Called Give Us a Hand, the display features a unique mix of hand prints and poetry created by survivors of child abuse.

The display was created through a number of workshops held across the country and hosted by psychotherapist/sculptor Dr. Michael Irving, founder of the Survivor Monument Project.

The public has the opportunity to literally lend a hand in the display's development. For a donation you can trace the outline of your hand on a piece of paper and include an inspirational message that will be added to the inside of the bronze sculpture when it is constructed. Donations will go to fight child abuse.

Canadian Red Cross volunteers will be staffing the display to answer questions about their organization's Abuse Prevention Services.


Metro Town Mall: Ken Clint and the Canadian Red Cross staffed displays and gathered HandPrints in British Columbia.
Winnipeg Free Press, Friday October 8, 1999

No more silence

Give Us a Hand child-abuse exhibit coordinator Jake Goertzen holds miniature model of bronze Survivor Monument to be unveiled in Toronto next October. The display, running until Sunday at Kildonan Place mall bears a message that child abuse can be discussed in an open, healthy manner.

THE HERALD - Thursday, October 14, 199?

Monument to pay tribute to child abuse survivors

Jake Goertzen holds a replica of the Survivor Monument, which will be built in Toronto.

By Catherine Ogloza
Herald Correspondent

Child abuse affects more children across the country than any statistic can prove.

It's because of this harsh reality that Kildonan Place hosted a campaign for child abuse survivors called Give Us A Hand.

The exhibit, which was at Kildonan Place over the Thanksgiving weekend, is part of the first 12-city cross-Canada tour of art from the Survivor Monument Project, funded in part by the Millennium Bureau of Canada.

The display featured a multitude of bronzed hand prints and poetry created by child abuse survivors and designed to stir awareness of child abuse in the community.

Jake Goertzen, sculptor and anchor person for the display, said the hand print is the overall theme of the campaign.

"The hands are reaching out to the rest of society saying, 'Look what happened to me. It shouldn't happen to anyone else.'"

Goertzen said the exhibit serves as an "educational campaign to allow the public to become more acquainted with problems and issues abused children have, and the different ways to overcome them."

Dr. Michael Irving of Toronto, founder of the Survivor Monument Project, believes in using art as a therapeutic tool. Goertzen agreed sculpting is certainly a way to reach deep down inside and find hidden emotions, adding it was through art that he was able to cope with his own feelings about being a victim of child abuse.

"It's a long (healing) process, but new paths that you didn't see before will open," said Goertzen. "We want to have created the precedence that you can have a public art display that deals with these painful subjects."

The Survivor Monument will be a large bronze sculpture and will resemble two figures, draped in large quilts made up of 250 patches. The patches will be the bronze hand prints, complete with personal messages from individuals. It will be unveiled in Toronto in October 2000.

The display gives the public a chance to participate in this project. For a small donation, people are invited to trace their hand prints and write messages of hope and anticipation for a better future. These hand prints will be included inside the actual sculpture when it is constructed in Toronto.

National project

"We want to collect hand prints from all across Canada,"said Goertzen, noting that will make it a truly national monument.

"It's a tremendous achievement for the world, as it's the first monument dedicated to abused children."

As people approached the extraordinary display in the mall, many wept as they read the poetry or studied the hand prints.

Goertzen said some people had commented on the strength of abused children. "Some people have said that these children are the strongest people in the world, to have been put through such pain and trauma, and to still continue on in their lives."

Canadian Red Cross volunteers were on hand to man the display and answer questions about Red Cross Abuse Prevention Services which include seminars and workshops to educate adults and children and provide information on where to get for help.

 

Time: Thursday, Oct 7, 1999
The Head Give us a Hand
October 6-10, 1999


A unique display of handprints and poetry, created by survivors of child abuse is on exhibit at Centre Court. Contribute your own handprint and message for a small donation to Canadian Centre for Child Abuse Awareness.

 

Time: October 9, 1999
ALEXANDRA BURGESS For The Sun

People are putting their hands down on abuse.

The Give Us a Hand Exhibit will be displayed at Kildonan Place Shopping Mall until tomorrow.

Winnipeg is the second stop for the exhibit - a tribute to abuse survivors designed to raise funds for the first memorial to abuse survivors in the world, scheduled to be unveiled in Toronto in October 2000.

"The response has been wonderful,"Manitoba coordinator Jake Goertzen said of the Survivor Monument Project, which has been in the works for a decade. "There's been over $1 million raised in donations. Dozens of businesses and hundreds of individuals have contributed and all the names are listed on display."

The exhibit features handprints of abuse survivors, a replica of the monument and a display from 10 schools in the Transcona division.

People who visit the exhibit are encouraged to make a monetary donation and draw an outline of their hand with an inscribed message or poem.

Goertzen said organizers still need to raise about $1 million to pay for the bronzing of the monument.

 

The Red River Valley Echo, Monday October 4, 1999
Local artist to perform at survivor monument display
By Barbara Shewchuk


A Horndean artist will help open and host a display promoting a new piece of art, at Kildonan Place Shopping Centre, Oct. 6 through 10.

The Survivor Monument Project is a year-long traveling art and education exhibit leading up to the unveiling of a two-piece bronze monument to survivors of child abuse. It will be called, "Reaching Out".

Artist and classical guitarist Jake Goertzen will make brief musical and oral presentations about the exhibit twice each day, at 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. (starting at 7:30 Wednesday).

A display of hand prints and poetry, created by survivors of child abuse, will be featured in the interactive touring exhibit called "give us a hand". The tour is intended to honour the survivors of child abuse and give the public a chance to see that it can be discussed in an open, healthy manner.

"These are art pieces and poetry that tell a story of hope, survival and victory,"said Joanna Loney of Kildonan Place (at the corner of Lagimodiere and Regent in Winnipeg.)

Created in workshops across Canada by psychotherapist and sculptor Dr. Michael Irving of Toronto, the founder of the Survivor Monument Project, the pieces will form the basis of a two-piece bronze monument 35 feet wide and 11 feet high. It will be installed in a Toronto park and unveiled in Oct., 2000.

For a small donation, people can trace their hand print and write an inspirational message that will be included inside the actual sculpture when it is constructed.

Goertzen, a sculptor and artist who has included child abuse in his artistic themes over the years, was chosen to represent the project in Manitoba.

"I met Dr. Michael Irving in Washing, DC, six years ago. He was doing his Ph.D. at the time - and devoted about four chapters in his thesis to my work. Ten years ago he conceived of this project, the Survivor Monument project. He himself came from a horrendous abuse background.

"It's miraculous that he conceived of this project. It involved hundreds of this project. It involved hundreds of people and many thousands of hours. About a million dollars has been raised, not just for the monument but for education about abuse prevention."

Canadian Red Cross volunteers will be on hand to answer questions about its abuse prevention services, which include seminars and workshops to educate adults and children. Goertzen will also be available to help.

"They wanted someone who was trained as a therapist to be present."

The exhibit opens Oct. 6 with an official opening at 7:30 p.m. that day. It is supported by the federal government's Millennium fund and co-sponsored by the Red Cross with support from numerous other agencies. Any other monies collected will go to the Canadian Centre for Abuse Awareness.

Goerzten to perform
Goertzen will perform a piece of music written especially for the occasion. "I composed a song I dedicated to him (Irving), called 'Give us a hand, we're reaching out.'"

The monument is made up about 200 bronze plaques with hand prints and Goertzen will be working with Irving at a workshop involving that in November.

Goertzen believes terrible experiences in childhood can be overcome with the right help, and his work reflects his emerging optimism. "My early work depicts and tries to express the child's point of view of his experience in life. It shows the negative and also the positive. My later work is focusing more on the blossoming of life.

"When there's been child abuse, it's a roadblock to further growth and once you overcome that, there's a blossoming of life."

Handprints by schoolchildren will be among those inserted into the completed monument.

Local artist encourages participation In Survivor Monument project

Picture1
Elisha Cumbers/Echo
Jake Goertzen with model of the Survivor Project Monument.

Picture2
Handprints by schoolchildren will be among those inserted into the completed monument.

By Elisha Cumbers

For many victims of child abuse, the healing process is a difficult, sometimes almost impossible one.

That's why people like Jake Goertzen have decided to 'give survivors a hand.'

Goertzen, a point person for The Survivor Monument Project, headed up a display in Winnipeg last weekend in Kildonan Place. The display, entitled the "Give Us A Hand" tour, featured art and poetry from child abuse survivors. Kildonan Place was only one in a series of stops across Canada.

The display also featured the definitions of various forms of abuse, including physical, emotional, verbal, sexual and neglect. Along with these definitions were ways to stop the cycle of abuse, including counseling and educating victims.

The Survivor Monument Project is an initiative begun by Dr. Michael Irving. His goals include having participants from all over the country take part in the unveiling of a large monument in the fall of 2000 in downtown Toronto.

The monument, which will be 32 feet across and 11 feet high, will stand as a permanent reminder to be aware of and to honour child abuse victims. The monument features two robed figures standing next to each other with arms outstretched as a gesture of help and support.

Canadians who wish to take part can do so by attending workshops throughout the country. There, they learn how to make a piece of art which includes their handprint, in a wax cast on an 11 by 11" square piece. They are free to add their thoughts, images and feelings to their art.

Each participant receives his own creation in cast paper painted to look like bronze, then framed and mounted. The mold goes to Dr. Irving to be used on the robe in the final sculpture, thereby giving each person an outlet for their courage - not to mention a little piece of immortality.
Continue on page 28

"It's more than making handprints and art," said Goertzen. "It becomes the first step towards the healing process for many people. It shows people that they are not alone."

The unveiling of the monument will mark the launching of an annual National Child Abuse Awareness Week. A workshop will be held from Nov.5 to 10 at the cost of $200 (for materials) at Knox United Church on Edmonton Street in Winnipeg.

Anyone who wishes to participate may do so by calling Jake Goertzen at 829-7800.

Time : Wednesday, October 27,1999
EYE ON THE ISLANDS
A look at Richmond's social scene

MESSAGES OF HOPE:


Nearly 100 locals traced their hand prints and wrote inspirational words during the Give Us a Hand Tour at Lansdowne Park Shopping Centre earlier this month. The tour is intended to honour the survivors of child abuse and raised $642 toward the Survivor Monument to be unveiled next October.
GIVE US A HAND

Mill Woods Town Centre, Canadian Red Cross Abuse Prevention Services and The Examiner are partnering with the Survivor Monument Project to bring the Give Us A Hand cross-Canada Tour to Edmonton. The monument is a tribute to the positive stories of individuals who have overcome, as best they can, the tragedy of child abuse.

Give Us A Hand to provide courage and hope for those people recovering from abuse. Trace your handprint and write an inspirational message. Drop your handprint off at the Mill Woods Town Centre Survivor Monument exhibit in the fountain area by Oct. 31. All handprints and messages will be collected throughout the Canadian Tour to be encased in a bronze monument as a tribute to the survivors of abuse. The monument will be unveiled in the year 2000.

Art by Survivors of Child Abuse featured in "Give Us a Hand Display"
Oshawa Centre

A unique display of hand prints and poetry, created by survivors of child abuse was featured at Oshawa Centre in an interactive touring exhibit called " Give Us A Hand".

The Display was part of the first national tour of art from the Survivor Monument Project and is funded in part by the Millennium Bureau of Canada.

Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited sponsored this tour which will visit 12 centres across Canada.

The display ran from Jan 12 to Jan 16th and was intended to honour the survivors of child abuse and give the public the opportunity to see that child abuse can be discussed in an open, healthy manner.

"These are art pieces and poetry that tell a story of hope, survival and victory," says Lucia Tignanelli, Marketing Director of the Oshawa Centre.

Created in workshops across Canada by psychotherapist and sculptor Dr. Michael Irving of Toronto, the founder of the Survivor Monument Project, the pieces will form the basis of a two-piece bronze monument to be unveiled in October 2000.

Canadian Red Cross volunteers staffed the display and answered questions about Red Cross Prevention Services, which include seminars and workshops to educated adults and children about child abuse and where to go for help.

Dr. Irving is in private psychotherapy practice and has worked extensively with survivors of child abuse and child sexual abuse.

His stone and bronze sculptures are in private and corporate collections and have exhibited internationally.

Healing Artwork Project helps victims ease trauma of abuse by Bill Kaufman By Bill Kaufmann
8 News The Calgary Sun, Wednesday, October 27 1999

Local victims of child sexual abuse are using art to heal their emotional scars while crafting a memorial to help others.

Seven victims of sexual abuse - including former Calgary Flame Sheldon Kennedy - are submitting bronze panels to be included in an ambitious Child Abuse Survivor Monument.

"It's very important for me to move forward from the abuse in the past," said Lenora Southgate, who was sexually abused by a Calgary neighbour between the ages of 10 and 12.

Southgate is crafting a small panel depicting her sources of strength in overcoming the trauma of her abuse.

It will be one of 204 quilt-like squares that will comprise a memorial in the form of two large, embracing figures to be unveiled next October in Toronto.

Another 72 squares will be devoted to children's handprints to be cast in bronze.
"It's being done in the hope others who have had the same abuse experience will know there's a way to heal, that there's lot of help out there," said Southgate.

From Nov. 3-7, an interactive display of hand prints and poetry from the monument project will be featured at Southcentre mall.

Monument aims to fight child abuse by Jeff Adams
Calgary Herald, Thursday, November 4, 1999

A Toronto psychiatrist who endured prolonged sexual and emotional abuse as a child was so inspired by the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C, that he decided to create a similar monument for child-abuse victims.

Dr. Michael Irving's partially completed Child Abuse Survivor Monument, featuring the artwork and messages of hundreds of abuse victims, is at Southcentre Mall this week.
The final version is slated for completion and installation in downtown Toronto by next October, and another one has been proposed for the United Nations headquarters in New York.

"Monuments are something your do to recognize adversity and heroism - and child-abuse victims have certainly faced adversity and are heroes," Irving said Wednesday.

Irving had escaped an abusive stepfather , and gone on the launch successful careers, in both psychotherapy and sculpting, by the time he visited Washington's Vietnam memorial in 1991.

He became convinced child-abuse victims deserved similar recognition, and began talking to victims, therapists and artists about ways to do so.

Irving said the emotional power of the Vietnam memorial comes from its seemingly endless list of the names of U.S. soldiers who died in the Vietnam War. Each name was once a person - someone who lived and loved.

It'd be inappropriate for a child-abuse monument to feature victims' names because many want to remain anonymous. Instead, Irving's monument features abuse victims' hands.

"The physical presence of someone' s hand makes it real and personal," he said.

The two-piece bronze monument, entitled Reaching Out, will feature figures with arms stretched wide and draped in quilts. The quilts will have a cumulative 276 squares, each of which will contain a distinct hand image.

Most images have been or are being made by abuse survivors - including Lenora Southgate, who told a news conference at Southcentre Mall the creating the image and other artwork has "helped me to heal and recover."

Several wax or photographed versions of the abuse victims' hands images are at South center, along with colour sketches of the intended four-metre-by 10-metre monument.
Beside one image is the message, "May hope be passed through every hand," and alongside another is: "The pain of my childhood is today's woman."

The Reaching out display offers visitors a chance to sketch their own hands, add messages, and have them posted nearby. The thousands of contributions will be inserted in the hollow monument for posterity.

One young artist's sketch offered an urgent message to victims: "Don't be afraid. Tell someone." The display has already visited several Canadian cities, and will keep touring Canada next year to raise public awareness about child abuse - including experts' fears that more than 90 percent of abuse is not reported.

More than $1 million was spent creating and promoting the monument.

Survivors piece lives together with quilt
Child abuse victims find solace in national memorial project by Dipti Chakravorty
2 Calgary Herald Neighbours Zone 4 Week of November 4, 1999

Kim Stood in the shadows of a couple of life-size sculptures in a Toronto studio last spring and a strange sense of safety prevailed over her.

The figures make up the Child Abuse Survivor Monument, which will be in stalled next to the University of Toronto greenhouses in October, 2000. Their arms, draped in quilted bronze shawls, stretch out and upwards, symbolizing victory for the survivors.

Kim, a Calgary woman, flew east to attend a quilt block workshop for child abuse survivors. She mad a casting of her hand in wax on which she also inscribed her message of personal survival. The piece, mounted on a 10-inch square wooden frame, will be plastered in bronze.

A total of 204 of these bronze squares, created by survivors across the country, will be joined to from a quilted shawl, covering the majority of the surface area of the three-metre-by nine-metre bronze status.

"The project gives voice to the tragic issue of child abuse," Kim says. "All of the pieces will be on the monument. Each story is honoured."

About one out of three girls and one out of five boys in Canada will have had unwanted sexual experience, according to the National Clearinghouse on Family Violence, 1994. Yet shame prevents families from reporting these cases.

The semicircular monument is designed to reach out and embrace all who have endured the pain of abuse, says Kim.

"I had a feeling of intense calm and safety standing underneath the form."

But right now, the Give Us A Hand art exhibit, a collection of quilt squares that are replicas of the images to be mounted on the monument, is traveling through Canada. It will be on view at Southcentre Mall until Nov 7.

Kim, 36, runs her hand gently over her art work, depicting three angels that bring her gifts, Her biological father gave her a star. Her unborn baby, that she aborted, gave her a tear of compassion and forgiveness. Her grandmother presented her with a rose for beauty and strength.

The inscription "I am never alone" runs along the side.

For the first 28 years of her life Kim suffered in silence, eventually revealing her abuse in 1991.

"I though this wasn't happening to anybody else in the world," says the mother-to-be, who chose not to use her last name for anonymity.

"I was emotionally isolated. I couldn't speak out."

Meeting other survivors through the monument project opened her eyes to the alarming rate of child abuse in society.

"Knowing I'm not alone validates my experience."

More than 90 percent of cases aren't reported, according to a Gallup poll taken four years ago.

Though the emotional scars healed, she still grieved deep down. She covered up the pain with her caring, bubbly personality. Her abuser admitted to the crime, which was comforting, to a degree.

Her story, as she tells through the art, ends on a hopeful note: A mother, cuddling a baby, amasses strength from the angels, the bearers of good tidings.

"I'm going to have my own child. I'm going to be a good mother. The energy flowing gives me the strength to not be alone. Accept myself for who I am."

Lenora Southgate also suffered in silence. Her neighbour molested her over a two-year period. When she disclosed the abuse, she was told to stay away for him. End of story.
Confused, frightened and ashamed, she tried to obliterate the past by working hard, long hours. She turned into an overachieving, workaholic entrepreneur. The memories often haunt her.

"At times I have this sense of dread, loathing," says Southgate, 52.

She is in therapy and has learned to confront the troubles. During meditation one day she recalled the abuse as they had occurred.

"That started the healing process," says Southgate, a mother of two and a grandmother.
"Finally, I understood why I have been feeling the way I have."

Southgate has carved Egyptian goddesses in her work for the monument project.
The images with their arms reaching upwards to the sun, which embraces everyone in its warmth, symbolize rebirth, protection and energy, she says.

"Healing process for me is being reborn. I can rise above what happened to me in the past and hopefully someday I can experience life without the pain.
"It has been very cathartic participating in the workshops."

Though the workshops were therapeutic, they were also exhausting, especially for Kim who was in the early stages of pregnancy.

"Most people do therapy verbally," she says. "Creating of art is a process of healing, which involves getting in touch with the soul. This was a fulfilling experience but emotionally exhausting work."

Give Us a Hand is on display at Southcentre Mall through Nov. 7. Viewers can trace their hand on a sheet of paper for inclusion inside the monument.

Oct 6, 1999
Sculpting young minds

Dr. Michael Irving asks Branit Studenica, 7, about his drawing at Bayshore Public School yesterday. Irving will include children's messages of hope inside a two-piece bronze sculpture to be unveiled in October 2000.

JA Media Services
Media Summary Listing


Attention: Patrick Kenny
ACART Communications Inc.
Newsline - BBS/CJOH TV - 6:00 PM - October 6 - Ottawa
Announcer Copy
Clips: Speaker At The Event


Synopsis: An art exhibit by child abuse survivors went on display today at Bayshore Shopping Centre. The exhibit is called Give Us A Hand and is the beginning of a campaign to increase the awareness of child abuse.

(20 seconds)
You Community Newspaper Saturday, Oct. 9, 1999
Sharing the memory, shaping the dream
Bayshore students give a hand to child abuse survivors by James Deagle

When it comes to healing the pain of child abuse, local grade school students are more than willing to lend a hand.

On Oct. 6 an estimated 5000 students from Bayshore Catholic School and Bayshore Public School assembled at the Bayshore Shopping Centre for the donation of hand prints to the Child Abuse Survivor's Monument. The donations consisting of tracings of the children's hands embellished with their own messages and colouring, will comprise part of the monument when it is unveiled in Toronto in October 2000.

The originator of the project, Dr. Michael Irving, sees it as an example of art as healing.

Irving described "heroes" as those who meet adversity, such as war veterans or Red Cross workers. He also included in this definition "people who were once abused as children and now talk about it."

"These hands represent hope and visualization, and are an image of the world in a different way."

In an interview with The Clarion, Irving recalled the genesis of the project almost 10 years ago, when he was working in Toronto as a clinician with child abuse survivors. He remembered how art often played a role in their healing.

Another source of inspiration for the initiative was the Vietnam Memorial in Washington DC, a mecca for families of soldiers who died in the Vietnam War. The post-traumatic stress disorder suffered by many war veterans, he noted, is similar to the effects on adult survivors of child abuse.

"The role of a public monument is to make people change," said Irving. "Art has always had the role of healing," When there are the "walking wounded" among us, he said, "society is vicariously wounded."

Irving received his PhD in art and psychology from the Union Institute in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he wrote a doctorate on "art and healing".

The event on Wednesday was part of a 12 - stop nationwide tour of the project's art work so far, and is sponsored by Bayshore Shopping Centre's parent company, Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited. Funding to the tune of $150,000 has also come from the Canadian Government's Canadian Millennium Partnership Program.

"These are art pieces and poetry that tell a story of hope, survival and victory," commented Moira McGrath, Marketing Director for Bayshore Shopping Centre.

In addition to the drawings collected on the cross-country tour, the monument will also feature bronze hand imprints from survivors and notables, such as Ken Dryden and Sheldon Kennedy.

Those wishing to donate their own handprints to the project may submit them to 274 Rhodes Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M4L 3A3. To find out more, visit the monument's web site at www.childabusemonument.org.

The art will be on display at Bayshore Shopping Centre until Oct 9. The exhibit will be staffed by members of the Canadian Red Cross, who will answer questions about Red Cross Preventative Services.

Nepean This Week, Friday October 15, 1999
Children provide handprints and messages

Nepean This Week, Friday October 15, 1999
Hundreds of hands reach out to end child abuse by Brent Dowdall

By putting hands together from across the country, Dr. Michael Irving wants to put and end to child abuse - or at least make a permanent monument to bring attention to the problem.

Irving has worked for the past nine years to build the Child Abuse Survivor Monument Project - a two-piece six-to-seven ton bronze sculpture with several hundred hands carved in it that will be dedicated next October.

As part of the nationwide project, a touring exhibition of hand prints and poetry was on display at Bayshore Shopping Centre from October 6 to 10, called the Give Us a Hand tour.

On the opening day of the exhibit, Irving gathered some 6000 handprints from students at Bayshore Catholic and Public Schools for inclusion inside the monument itself. The students traced their hand prints and added an inspirational message to their prints at workshops the previous day in their schools.

The Survivor monument will be placed at the northwest corner of College and University Avenues in Toronto and will be unveiled on October 21, 2000.

Irving says he decided to make a child abuse monument in the fall of 1990, while visiting the Vietnam war memorial and Holocaust museum in Washington DC, where he says he saw the power of sculpture and art to affect and transform people in an emotional way.
"I thought a child abuse memorial needed to be personal like the Vietnam war memorial," he says.

"The hands was the attempt to make it personal like the Vietnam war memorial," says Irving, "so putting somebody's hand was about being personal and making it real, with real people."

Irving has dual careers as a psychotherapist and a sculptor. He says e has always been a sculptor, but working as a psychotherapist with people who have suffered abuse made him want to help their cause in some way.

"I had a lot of referrals of severe abuse survivors just because of my skill." says Irving, "and just as a human being you hear those stories and there's a desire to respond and react beyond just a clinical desire. There's a human element of wanting to respond to the tragedy of child abuse."

In addition to the students, the event at Bayshore also included remarks from leaders of regional social service agencies. St. Paul's (Toronto) MP Carolyn Bennett attended and provided a handprint from deputy prime minister Herb Gray for inclusion in the monument.
At the end of the ceremony every student left their hand print and message with Irving, and the hundreds of papers literally covered the stage. The messages from the children about child abuse were clear.

"You can break my bones but never break my hope for child abuse to end and world peace to being," wrote student Olivia Grace beside her hand print.

Irving says the children have a better understanding of the horror of child abuse than adults.

"Read what the kids say, they know better than we do," says Irving.

The national tour will bring the monument to the Canadian public through exhibitions at malls, galleries and museums.

The tour began in Nepean and it will make stops in cities from St. John's to Vancouver in October. In January and February, it will go back on the road again.

Irving says he has been working full-time on the monument - 70 to 100 hours a week - since 1996. He continues to practice psychotherapy one evening and one morning a week and the monument is being prepared in his Toronto studio.

(He has also obtained)(sic) government has provided $150,000 from the Millennium Bureau of Canada, and Cambridge Shopping Centres Limited, which owns the Bayshore Shopping Centre, is sponsoring this tour at its 12 centres.

Bayshore also contributed a $1.200.00 donation representing a $2 donations on behalf of all 600 children.

Anyone can trace their hand at Bayshore for a $2 donation toward the monument project, and have their hand print included in the monument project.


"The input on this has been enormous. The collaboration has been enormous and I think part of the power and effectiveness of this is that collaboration," says Irving.


VOCM NEWS
All The News - All The Time

745 Wednesday Kinsman/Village Col Fm

A unique exhibit goes on display today at the village shopping center in St. John's. The "Give Us A Hand" display features hand prints and poetry by survivors of child abuse. Village Shopping Centre Marketing Director Phyllis Kinsmand says it's a good way to raise awareness of the issue.

<<KINSMAN>> ….Healthy Manner

It will be on display from today until Sunday.

The Windsor Star - Local
Art takes aim at abuse
Sculpture memorial to sexually abused children by Don Lajoie

Windsor and Essex Country residents have been invited to reach out to children whose lives have been stained by the tragedy of sexual abuse.

The Give us a Hand tour, supporting the Survivor Monument Project to build a sculpture commemorating sexually abused children arrived at Devonshire Mall Wednesday.

Visitors to the display will be able to support the project by donating money to trace their handprint or write an inspirational message that will be included on the Reaching Out monument when it is unveiled next October in Toronto.

In opening the display, Mayor Mike Hurst said child abuse injuries "physically, mentally and in spirit." He added the monument will bring attention to the problem and show society is now ready to shed light on what has been a dark and secret issue.
"This speaks to us of hope now, and in the future," Hurst said.

It was a them picked up by speakers that included sexual assault counselors, children's aid workers, emergency room nurses and adult survivors of childhood abuse.

Even a class of Grade 6 pupils from Our Lady of Mount Carmel school lent their voices of support to the victims when they shouted, in unison, "it's not your fault."

Bill Beavan, director of the Children's Aid Society, said the center handles 400 calls a year regarding child abuse. But, he added, the problem runs deeper than that because the vast majority of victims are too frightened or intimidated to speak out.

"Looking at your kids who are here today, it's you guys who can help out," he told the student. "If you know someone who is too afraid to tell someone, then you tell."

Overwhelmed
Pointing to the display of hand prints and verses already collected for the sculpture Becan stated: " I'm overwhelmed by the pictures on the wall. I read one of them and all it said was 'stop it.' That's what the Children's Aid Society would like to do."

Karen Conner, a nurse with the Safe Kids Sexual Assault Treatment Centre at Hotel-Dieu Grace Hospital, said staff there examine 100 to 120 children every year for sexual abuse. Some are referred through children's aid, some by police. Once, she recalled, was a seven-year-old boy who had the courage to report his abuse himself directly to police.
"He was a dandy," Conner said. "It just tore at my hair."

She said the key to stopping the abuse is awareness and education. The monument, which will be in the form of two walls containing a checkerboard of panels featuring the imprints of survivor's hands, will be a powerful symbol of society reaching out to the victims.

Pauline Jalenkiewicz, and 11-year-old in the Grade 6 class, said she believes children are now aware of the issue, but the monument will make it easier for them to talk.

"It's important because some (children) are too scared or too shy to talk," she said. "It totally affects them on the inside."

The three-metre high and 10-metre wide walls of the bronze monument incorporate the artistic contributions of 204 survivors and 72 Canadian children.

The federal government has contributed $150,000 for the project under the Canadian Millennium Partnership.

The display is on tour across Canada.

National Monument Tour

The "Give US a Hand" touring Survivor Monument Project had a brief stop at Devonshire Mall at the end of October. The project itself was conceived by Dr. Michael Irving, a Toronto psychotherapist and sculptor, who wanted to create a tribute to those victims who either survived or succumbed. For a small donation, people were encouraged to trace their hand print and write an inspirational message that will be included inside the actual sculpture when it is constructed. The bronze monument will be unveiled in October of 2000.


Fri, Oct 22/99, Burlington Post
Child abuse is event topic

The thoughts and works of child abuse survivors will be featured at an exhibit opening Wednesday at Mapleview Shopping Centre.

Entitled Give Us A Hand, the interactive display features hand prints and poetry and is part of the first national tour of art from the Survivor Monument Project.

It will run from Oct. 27-31 at Mapleview and sponsor Cambridge Shopping Centres is holding the event at 11 other centers from coast to coast.

The display is intended to honour child abuse survivors and show the public the topic can be discussed in an open, healthy manner.

"These are art pieces and poetry that tell a story of hope, survival and victory," said Angela Mathieson, marketing director for Mapleview Centre.

Canadian Red Cross volunteers will staff the Mapleview display and answer questions about their organization's abuse prevention services. These include seminars and workshops to educate adults and children about child abuse and where to go for help.

The art pieces were created in workshops held across Canada by psychotherapist and sculptor Dr. Michael Irving of Toronto.

The pieces will form the basis of a two-piece bronze monument to be unveiled in October, 2000.

From a small donation, members of the public can trace a hand print and write an inspirational message to be included in the sculpture.

14 Sunday The Calgary Sunday Sun, November 21, 1999
Give Us A Hand


Applause, Please … Colleen Klein, wife of Premier Ralph Klein, and former Calgary Flames superstar Lanny McDonald were at Southcentre recently to lend a hand at the Give Us A Hand media conference. The conference was in support of The Child Abuse Survivor Monument.

8 News The Calgary Sun, Saturday, November 6, 1999
Art tour fights abuse


My Sooz and I were colouring on Wednesday - and I don't mean our hair! Rather, we were two of the "celebrity" gang on hand at Southcentre to take part in the national tour of art from the Survivor Monument Project.

As part of the tour, Celebes drew an imprint of their hand and wrote an inspirational message about child abuse.

The art will be encapsulated in the monument. Over one million hand-drawn squares with messages will eventually be encapsulated.

My message? "Children are our window to the future - let that window not be broken."
"Mr. Charity", Lanny McDonald, was of course there to lend support (could there possibly be a better friend to children's causes than Lanny?}.

A lady whom I have unlimited respect for, Barb Higgins, was also there with her usual charm; as was Mrs. Premier, Colleen Klein, who gives so much of her time.
Dr. Michael Irving, the founder and sculptor of the project, recalls many years ago being incredibly moved by the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, DC

"Monuments have a healing quality about them," he said. "Survivors of child abuse are heroes too and deserve to be honoured … hence the Survivor Monument Project."

The Child Abuse Survivor Monument will be at Southcentre until tomorrow.

The Red River Valley Echo, Monday October 18, 1999
Local artist encourages participation in Survivor Monument project


Jake Goertzen co-hosts monument promotion by Elisha Cumbers

For many victims of child abuse, the healing process is a difficult, sometimes almost impossible one.

That's why people like Jake Goertzen have decided to 'give survivors a hand.'
Goertzen, a point person for The Survivor Monument Project, headed up a display in Winnipeg last weekend in Kildonan Place. The display, entitled the "Give Us A Hand" tour, featured art and poetry from child abuse survivors. Kildonan Place was only one ins a series of stops across Canada.

The display also featured the definitions of various forms of abuse, including physical, emotional, verbal, sexual and neglect. Along with these definitions were ways to stop the cycle of abuse, including counseling and educating victims.

The Survivor Monument Project is an initiative begun by Dr. Michael Irving. His goals include having participants from all over the country take part in the unveiling of a large monument downtown Toronto.

The monument, which will be 32 feet across and 11 feet high, will stand as a permanent reminder to be aware of and to honour child abuse victims. The monument features two robed figures standing next to each other with arms outstretched as a gesture of help and support.

Canadians who wish to take part can do so by attending workshops throughout the country. There, they learn how to make a piece of art which includes their handprint, in a wax cast on an 11 by 11" square piece. They are free to add their thoughts, images and feelings to their art.

Each participant receives his own creation in cast paper painted to look like bronze, then framed and mounted. The mold goes to Dr. Irving to be used on the robe in the final sculpture, thereby giving each person an outlet for their courage - not to mention a little piece of immortality.

"It's more than making handprints and art," said Goertzen. "It becomes the first step towards the healing process for many people . It shows people that they are not alone,"
The unveiling of the monument will mark the launching of an annual National Child Abuse Awareness Week. A workshop will be held from Nov. 5 to 10 at the cost of $200 (for materials) at Knox United Church on Edmonton Street in Winnipeg.

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Your Donations are Needed
to Bring the Child Abuse Monument Home from the Foundry

* Donations *
* Story of the Monument/Phases of the Project * Phase 1: Design * Phase II: Create * Phase III: Implement * Phase IV:Positioning *
* Monument Overview * Monument Project Organization * Project Story - Flash Movie *
* A Healing Monument * Monument as Social Action * A Gift for Allies in Healing *
* Artistic Director: Michael C. Irving, Ph.D. * Assisting Sculptors * Studio Visits *
* Monument Conception/Creation * Monument Sculpting * Casting the Bronze *
* Quilt Square Workshop Participants *
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* Information on Child Abuse
* Types of Abuse * Impacts of Abuse * Responses to Abuse *
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